Esmonde Photography by Patrick Esmonde.

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public galleries...Date...June 18, 2004


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Candelabro :: Reserva Nacional de Paracas, Perú :: © 2004 Patrick Esmonde
Candelabro  I swear this was created by a group of enterprising Peruvians who knew that tourists would flock from everywhere to see this sight. Explanations abound, but I´m going to stick my business instincts.

Like the lines of Nazca, if you want a really good view, try an online search. It was very cloudy, and I´m not too happy with the results.
Guano Makers :: Reserva Nacional de Paracas, Perú :: © 2004 Patrick Esmonde
Guano Makers  Each bird produces 1 meter of guano (bird crap) per year. The guano is bagged by workers and then sold as a high-powered fertilizer - one of the best in the world. The collection and sale of guano put Peru on the map of global trade. Since then mob families have run the islands, effectively making a major business from bird excrement.
Flock Of Guano Bombardiers :: Reserva Nacional de Paracas, Perú :: © 2004 Patrick Esmonde
Flock Of Guano Bombardiers  Loaded with fresh of guano readied for launch, these birds hovered hauntingly above us almost the entire trip. Only one passenger got nailed. There are literally tens of thousands of these birds on these islands.  They eat fish, sleep on the rocks, and never come to mainland. A boring life if you ask me, but they have been doing it for thousands of years, so I guess they like it.
Lone Guano Bombardier :: Reserva Nacional de Paracas, Perú :: © 2004 Patrick Esmonde
Lone Guano Bombardier  Scouting the horizon, this bird had only the foulest of intentions. I´m sure that even as I took this picture, he was eyeing me and putting in a request for cargo drop on my boat.
Islas Ballestas 1 :: Reserva Nacional de Paracas, Perú :: © 2004 Patrick Esmonde
Islas Ballestas 1
Lobos Del Mar 1 :: Reserva Nacional de Paracas, Perú :: © 2004 Patrick Esmonde
Lobos Del Mar 1  Obviously not interested in posing for the hundreds of tourists in small boats, this sea lion, or "lobo del mar," didn´t blink the entire time we passed by.
Lobos Del Mar 2 :: Reserva Nacional de Paracas, Perú :: © 2004 Patrick Esmonde
Lobos Del Mar 2
Lobos Del Mar 3 :: Reserva Nacional de Paracas, Perú :: © 2004 Patrick Esmonde
Lobos Del Mar 3  These sea lions are not like the ones you see at Sea World. They have battle scars, are dirty, and would rather sleep that jump through hoops.
Ghost Rock :: Reserva Nacional de Paracas, Perú :: © 2004 Patrick Esmonde
Ghost Rock  This shot is of a cool light trick I really liked: the lighter rock in the center is actually behind the opening in the darker rock.  While sitting in a small boat at sea level, I was in perfect position for this composition to come to me.
Lobos Del Mar 4 :: Reserva Nacional de Paracas, Perú :: © 2004 Patrick Esmonde
Lobos Del Mar 4  I make no claims to being a nature or sports photographer. I´m simply happy I managed to get an image, albeit one out of focus. Good thing I wasn´t hired by National Geographic to cover these animals because I would have failed miserably!
Lobos Del Mar 5 :: Reserva Nacional de Paracas, Perú :: © 2004 Patrick Esmonde
Lobos Del Mar 5  Even after a large wave, the baby sea lions make it to shore with little trouble. From what the guide said, sea lions have no natural enemies here because the killer whales are too big to get into the small crevices and curves of the island. Population control is provided by the adult male sea lions, who will kill the young to protect their turf.
Lobos Del Mar 6 :: Reserva Nacional de Paracas, Perú :: © 2004 Patrick Esmonde
Lobos Del Mar 6
Islas Ballestas 3 :: Reserva Nacional de Paracas, Perú :: © 2004 Patrick Esmonde
Islas Ballestas 3
Workers´ Houses :: Reserva Nacional de Paracas, Perú :: © 2004 Patrick Esmonde
Workers' Houses  These buildings house the workers who collect guano (seabird and bat dung) for a period of three to four months every year. Maybe they get used to the smell, but I thought it was pretty pungent. Although the owners of these ´crap factories´ sell each bag of guano for more than US$70, they are obviously keeping their overhead costs low.
Peruvian Pueblito 1 :: Ica, Perú :: © 2004 Patrick Esmonde
Peruvian Pueblito 1  This tiny collection of huts was the closest thing to a city/town in the southern desert region of Lima.  The section in the front is used for religious ceremonies and events.

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